Economic Katrina

How many times have we heard that the Republicans trust us to do the right thing while the Democrats want to legislate our lives? I’m not going to go into the fact that it is the GOP that wanted to amend the Constitution to state their opposition to gay marriage, that it is the GOP that wants to restrict a woman’s right to do what she wants to do with her own body, or that it is the GOP that wants to legislate other “moral” issues.

Unfortunately, it seems in at least one industry (and possibly many more) they trusted the wrong people to “do the right thing.” The result is — in yet another case, but in a different landscape — the GOP is scrambling to fix something it should have seen coming and should have prepared for long ago.

It’s no surprise that since the economic house of cards built by the deregulation-crazed Republican guard over the past decade has now fallen, John McCain is suddenly talking about re-regulating things. He’s getting all high and mighty about how these Wall Street CEOs and CFOs and other people who just happened to contribute to his campaign have led us down this road.

I’m sorry, Senator, it was not them who led us here, but the Republicans who set up the trough where these executives were allowed to belly up and stuff themselves silly at the expense of the American taxpayer.

When creating legislation (in this case, de-regulation), it seems the Republicans can’t — or don’t want — to see the possible ramifications of their actions. They allow banks and investment firms to get into bed with each other and then are surprised when the two factions work together to build a giant bubble that inevitably pops, necessitating a government bailout. Surprise!

It was the same thing with the “Iraq resolution” that Robert Byrd said was handing the president a “blank check.” We give someone the power to abuse the system, then are shocked when they do so.

Does the GOP really expect us to believe that greed is not part of corporate America? Does it really expect us to believe that when it deregulates an industry and removes all the barriers to doing the wrong thing under the guise of “removing government bureaucracy” that they fully expected that all these executives would do things on the up-and-up?

If you believe that, I have a bridge in Alaska that I’d like to sell you.

Bottom line, the GOP knew exactly what it was doing here, and now John McCain is trying to run away from what Barack Obama calls the “final verdict” on Bush (and the GOP).

He can’t run away from it. He’s part of it. And now, he’s not even trying to hide the fact that he’s lying and flip-flopping at every turn. He just says whatever he wants, and even his most loyal supporters in the press are starting to call him on it.

Longtime supporter and Washington Post writer, Richard Cohen, recently noted he had long “been in the tank” for McCain, but now says

McCain has turned ugly. His dishonesty would be unacceptable in any politician, but McCain has always set his own bar higher than most. He has contempt for most of his colleagues for that very reason: They lie. He tells the truth. He internalizes the code of the McCains — his grandfather, his father: both admirals of the shining sea. He serves his country differently, that’s all — but just as honorably. No more, though.

David Ignatius, also a Post writer and McCain supporter, recently wrote this article about how McCain will do anything it takes to win, including lie. Here is a snippet:

Thinking about the Palin choice, you begin to ponder other moves McCain has made on the road to winning the Republican nomination. McCain was right a few years ago to warn that Bush’s tax cuts would have potentially ruinous fiscal consequences; now he favors extending the cuts that have produced a crisis of debt and deficit. Why did he switch his position, other than political opportunism?

In May 2006, after McCain had courted the Rev. Jerry Falwell in an effort to win conservative support, I asked him if he was bending his principles for the sake of winning. “I don’t want it that badly,” McCain answered. “I will continue to do what is right. . . . If that means I can’t get the Republican nomination, fine. I’ve had a happy life. The worst thing I can do is sell my soul to the devil.”

McCain can try to dodge this economic crisis all he wants. He can continue to state in face of the private views of just about any American you can find on the street that “the fundamentals of the economy are strong.” And he can flip-flop on the need for a certain amount of regulation in the economy.

My hope is that people see he is no longer Candidate McCain 2000, but Candidate McCain 2008.

The Republicans have led us down this road with the help of some right-leaning Democrats. John McCain cannot extricate himself from that party, no matter how hard he tries. He, along with his party, can take a gigantic share of the responsibility for what is happening today with the AIG, Fannie, Freddie, and Stearns bailouts. He can take partial responsibility for the failure of the 150 year old institution known as Lehman Brothers.

When you elect leaders, you have to hope they have the intelligence to know that if you leave legislative loopholes open, they will be used. When you open up the door for greed to take over, it will. You have to see where there is possible potential for abuse, especially in regard to corporations whose — by definition — only stated goal is to reap profits for executives and shareholders.

If you haven’t seen the movie, “The Corporation,” I urge you to see it. It argues that if corporations were people (and they are increasingly being legislated as such) they would be psychopaths who would be unable to exist in society at large. Would you trust a psychopath to do the right thing if he had any wiggle room to get more money if he did the wrong thing instead of staying on the straight-and-narrow?

John McCain helped free the same psychopath he is now saying he’d contain with regulation, now that the psychopath has destroyed a large section of the US economy.

I think we’ve had enough “reactionaries” in the White House. It’s time for someone who will be a little more offensive when it comes to these things. That’s really all there is to it.

This “Economic Katrina” should be enough to reveal to any rational person which choice is the right one in this election. The question is, will people believe John McCain when he lies to their face and tells them, “hey, I’m not responsible for this mess — remember I’m the maverick!”

This, despite his campaign crew being largely comprised of lobbyists and other assorted fat cats.

How many times have we heard that the Republicans trust us to do the right thing while the Democrats want to legislate our lives? I’m not going to go into the fact that it is the GOP that wanted to amend the Constitution to state their opposition to gay marriage, that it is the GOP that wants to restrict a woman’s right to do what she wants to do with her own body, or that it is the GOP that wants to legislate other “moral” issues. Unfortunately, it seems in at least one industry (and possibly many more) they trusted the wrong people to “do the right thing.”

It’s no surprise that since the economic house of cards built by the deregulation-crazed Republican guard over the past decade has now fallen, John McCain is suddenly talking about re-regulating things. He’s getting all high and mighty about how these Wall Street CEOs and CFOs and other people who just happened to contribute to his campaign have led us down this road.

I’m sorry, Senator, it was not them who led us here, but the Republicans who set up the trough where these executives were allowed to belly up and stuff themselves silly at the expense of the American taxpayer.

When creating legislation (in this case, de-regulation), it seems the Republicans can’t — or don’t want — to see the possible ramifications of their actions. They allow banks and investment firms to get into bed with each other and then are surprised when the two factions work together to build a giant bubble that inevitably pops, necessitating a government bailout.

Surprise! It was the same thing with the “Iraq resolution” that Robert Byrd said was handing the president a “blank check.” We give someone the power to abuse the system, then are shocked when they do so.

Does the GOP really expect us to believe that greed is not part of corporate America? Does it really expect us to believe that when it deregulates an industry and removes all the barriers to doing the wrong thing under the guise of “removing government bureaucracy” that they fully expected that all these executives would do things on the up-and-up?

If you believe that, I have a bridge in Alaska that I’d like to sell you.

Bottom line, the GOP knew exactly what it was doing here, and now John McCain is trying to run away from what Barack Obama calls the “final verdict” on Bush (and the GOP).

He can’t run away from it. He’s part of it.

And now, he’s not even trying to hide the fact that he’s lying and flip-flopping at every turn. He just says whatever he wants, and even his most loyal supporters in the press are starting to call him on it.

Longtime supporter and Washington Post writer, Richard Cohen, recently noted he had long “been in the tank” for McCain, but now says

McCain has turned ugly. His dishonesty would be unacceptable in any politician, but McCain has always set his own bar higher than most. He has contempt for most of his colleagues for that very reason: They lie. He tells the truth. He internalizes the code of the McCains — his grandfather, his father: both admirals of the shining sea. He serves his country differently, that’s all — but just as honorably. No more, though.

David Ignatius, also a Post writer and McCain supporter, recently wrote this article about how McCain will do anything it takes to win, including lie. Here is a snippet:

Thinking about the Palin choice, you begin to ponder other moves McCain has made on the road to winning the Republican nomination. McCain was right a few years ago to warn that Bush’s tax cuts would have potentially ruinous fiscal consequences; now he favors extending the cuts that have produced a crisis of debt and deficit. Why did he switch his position, other than political opportunism?

In May 2006, after McCain had courted the Rev. Jerry Falwell in an effort to win conservative support, I asked him if he was bending his principles for the sake of winning. “I don’t want it that badly,” McCain answered. “I will continue to do what is right. . . . If that means I can’t get the Republican nomination, fine. I’ve had a happy life. The worst thing I can do is sell my soul to the devil.”

McCain can try to dodge this economic crisis all he wants. He can continue to state in face of the private views of just about any American you can find on the street that “the fundamentals of the economy are strong.” And he can flip-flop on the need for a certain amount of regulation in the economy.

My hope is that people see he is no longer Candidate McCain 2000, but Candidate McCain 2008.

The Republicans have led us down this road with the help of some right-leaning Democrats. John McCain cannot extricate himself from that party, no matter how hard he tries. He, along with his party, can take a gigantic share of the responsibility for what is happening today with the AIG, Fannie, Freddie, and Stearns bailouts. He can take partial responsibility for the failure of the 150 year old institution known as Lehman Brothers.

When you elect leaders, you have to hope they have the intelligence to know that if you leave legislative loopholes open, they will be used. When you open up the door for greed to take over, it will. You have to see where there is possible potential for abuse, especially in regard to corporations whose — by definition — only stated goal is to reap profits for executives and shareholders.

If you haven’t seen the movie, “The Corporation,” I urge you to see it. It argues that if corporations were people (and they are increasingly being legislated as such) they would be psychopaths who would be unable to exist in society at large. Would you trust a psychopath to do the right thing if he had any wiggle room to get more money if he did the wrong thing instead of staying on the straight-and-narrow?

John McCain helped free the same psychopath he is now saying he’d contain with regulation, now that the psychopath has destroyed a large section of the US economy.

I think we’ve had enough “reactionaries” in the White House. It’s time for someone who will be a little more offensive when it comes to these things. That’s really all there is to it.

This “Economic Katrina” should be enough to reveal to any rational person which choice is the right one in this election. The question is, will people believe John McCain when he lies to their face and tells them, “hey, I’m not responsible for this mess — remember I’m the maverick!”

This, despite his campaign crew being largely comprised of lobbyists and other assorted fat cats.

Only in America could this guy still be tied in the race with the “change” candidate.

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